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Aging Gracefully Expo

Posted by on Sep 22, 2016 in Aging in Place, GBA News | Comments Off on Aging Gracefully Expo

Aging Gracefully Expo

Please join us for a community education even to empower you and your family to age gracefully in South Dakota.

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Community Pledge

Posted by on Jun 28, 2016 in GBA News | Comments Off on Community Pledge

Community Pledge

We, as a member of the business community, honor the spirit of Mitákuye Oyás’in (We are all Related) and acknowledge that we are all...

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Free Alzheimer’s and Dementia Information Day

Posted by on Apr 11, 2016 in GBA News | Comments Off on Free Alzheimer’s and Dementia Information Day

Free Alzheimer’s and Dementia Information Day

Join us on Saturday April 30th from 9am to 3pm at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Perpetual Help for free seminars. Click the link below for more information Alzheimers Workshop      

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Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

Posted by on Jan 15, 2016 in Safety Tips | Comments Off on Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

As the temperatures get colder, make sure you know how to stay warm. Wear warm winter clothes and plenty of extra layers, and listen for radio or television reports of travel advisories issued by the National Weather Service. Play it Safe Outdoors Unfortunately, we don’t have downy penguin coats to keep warm. When going outside, do not leave areas of the skin exposed to the cold. Learn to recognize the symptoms of hypothermia and frostbite. When exposed to cold temperatures, your body begins to lose heat faster than it can be produced. Prolonged exposure to cold will eventually use up your body’s stored energy. The result is hypothermia, or abnormally low body temperature. Body temperature that is too low affects the brain, making the victim unable to think clearly or move well. This makes hypothermia particularly dangerous because a person may not know it is happening and won’t be able to do anything about it. Victims of hypothermia are often elderly people with inadequate food, clothing, or heating, babies sleeping in cold bedrooms, and people who remain outdoors for long period. Warnings signs of hypothermia include shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech, and drowsiness. If you notice any of these signs, take the person’s temperature. If it is below 95°, the situation is an emergency—get medical attention immediately. Driving in a Winter Wonderland Driving in severe winter weather can be dangerous and lead to accidents. Be sure to prepare a winter emergency kit for your car. Include blankets, a flashlight, a shovel, an ice scraper, water and snacks, and a first aid kit. Make sure your car is serviced and has a full gas tank before a storm. Consider signing up for an all-weather driving course in your area to practice winter driving skills, and know what to do if you ever become stranded in your car. Stay Warm and Save $$$ Huddling is great, but may not be enough to keep you warm when winter weather hits. Learn how to prepare your home for winter weather and save on your electricity and heating bills. Insulating walls and attics, and putting weather-strips on doors and windows keeps heat inside and maximizes warmth. Handle Heating Equipment Safely When you need to warm up, take proper precautions and review instructions before handling heating equipment and fires. Have your heating system serviced by a qualified technician every year. Make sure fireplaces, wood stoves, and other combustion heaters are properly vented to the outside. Never leave children unattended near a space heater. Learn more by reading CDC’s Indoor Safety Guide. Don’t Forget Your (Other) Furry Friends If you have pets, make sure to bring them indoors. If you cannot bring them inside, provide adequate shelter to keep them warm and make sure they have access to unfrozen water. Stay Chill around Ice Walking on ice is dangerous and can cause serious falls on driveways, steps, and porches. Use rock salt or sand to melt the ice on driveways and sidewalks.If walking on ice can’t be avoided, walk like a penguin! Bend your back slightly and point your feet out – this increases your center of gravity. Stay flat-footed and take small steps or even shuffle for more stability. Keep your arms out to your sides to help balance. Support Each...

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New Colonial House!

Posted by on Jan 6, 2016 in Commercial, Food & Beverage, GBA News, Portfolio | Comments Off on New Colonial House!

New Colonial House!

Check out this great video released the Colonial House Restaurant & Bar that shows the transformation of their new space. We are proud to have been part of such a fun and amazing project. If you haven’t yet, make sure you visit their new location just a few blocks North of their old...

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Coming full circle

Posted by on Oct 20, 2015 in GBA News | Comments Off on Coming full circle

Coming full circle

Glenn Barber was featured in an article about the Westhills Village in the October Issue of the Rapid City Chamber of Commerce Investment Report. Back in 1984, Glenn participated in the ground breaking ceremony of the Westhills Village as the General Contractor. Thirty years later, he participated in a ribbon cutting of the newest expansion, this time as a resident. Click on the picture to read the full story!...

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Fall Into Safety

Posted by on Sep 24, 2015 in Safety Tips | Comments Off on Fall Into Safety

Fall Into Safety

Get Your Flu Shot ​​Autumn is the start of flu season, and it’s recommended that everyone 6 months and older gets vaccinated against the flu. Learn more on flu prevention and check out these common myths about the flu vaccine. Reduce Fear this Halloween Halloween is a fun-filled time for children, but there are many dangers associated with the holiday unrelated to ghouls, goblins and witches. Parents need to take the necessary Halloween safety precautions to make sure their children remain safe while still having fun. Check out our infographic on safe costume choices to help keep kids safe on Halloween. Drive Safely as it gets Darker Daylight Saving Time ends every year on the first Sunday in November. This means it starts to get darker earlier. As we set our clocks backward by one hour in most areas of the country, here are some tips for driving at night. Green Cross Tip: When you change your clocks, it’s also a great time to check the batteries in your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors.   Source: National Safety Council...

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10 ways to love your health

Posted by on Feb 13, 2015 in Safety Tips | Comments Off on 10 ways to love your health

10 ways to love your health

Valentine’s Day is a great time to celebrate love and can be a reminder to make healthy choices part of your everyday life. Whether you celebrate Valentine’s Day on your own or with someone else, take steps to be a healthy valentine. Treat yourself and loved ones to a healthy meal that includes fruits and vegetables and foods low in saturated fat and salt, and limit sweets. Nutrition plays an essential role in maintaining overall health. Plan an activity that encourages physical fitness. Regular physical activity can help control your weight, reduce your risk of heart disease and some cancers, improve mental health and mood, and increase your chance of living longer. Adults need 2 hours and 30 minutes of activity each week. If you smoke, quit smoking. Cigarette smoking it he leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States, accounting for 1 of every 5 deaths. Celebrate American Heart Month. At least 200,000 deaths from heart disease and stroke each year are preventable. Help raise awareness about heart disease prevention and learn how to lower heart disease risk! Join Million Hearts™ Learn the most common symptoms of a heart attack. Call 9-1-1 immediately if these symptoms occur. Prevent the spread of germs by washing your hands often, getting a flu vaccine, and avoiding close contact with someone that is sick. Prevent sexually transmitted diseases and unintended pregnancies. To lower your risk, abstain from sex or if you do choose to have sex use protection. Also, show your love by engaging in healthy behaviors before becoming pregnant. Limit alcohol consumption. Excessive alcohol use has immediate effects that can harm your health. Get health insurance at the Health Insurance Marketplace if you aren’t already covered. Enrollment ends on February 15. Don’t let Valentine’s Day plans stress you out. Learn ways to cope with stress and engage in healthy activities, including getting plenty of sleep.  ...

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5 promises to yourself you should make and keep

Posted by on Feb 9, 2015 in Aging in Place | Comments Off on 5 promises to yourself you should make and keep

5 promises to yourself you should make and keep

You make promises to yourself. Sometimes you keep them; sometimes you don’t. At the beginning of every year, millions of people make resolutions they already know they won’t stick with. Sometimes we try to trick ourselves that we’ll lose those last 10 pounds or we’ll volunteer our time more; and sometimes we just know we won’t do it as we make the promise. Well now that those resolutions are likely swept under the rug, why not think about the future? Why not plan ahead? And why not, instead, make promises to yourself to take a few steps now to ensure you have the future that you are dreaming about. Keep these promises to yourself Below are several promises to yourself you should make and keep this year. Start the habit today of being better to yourself. Promise #1: Write down your dreams, wishes and plans for retirement – We have it all in our heads, usually, the day dreams of playing golf every afternoon, sunning on the beach or even spending time with or taking care of our kids and grandkids in the years to come. Whatever your dreams include, put them on paper. Look at them. Hang them up even and let them inspire you as you plan for that reality. Perhaps they are not so far-fetched. These are your goals, and all they take are so really good planning. If you’re already retired, still do this exercise as it will continue to help you keep focused on your future. Promise #2: Review your financial status – All of your dreams and plans will require financial planning – and early and often! You can start by reviewing your income and then checking balances of all of your accounts, retirement plans / pensions, stocks, etc. Once your assessment is complete, make an appointment to talk to a financial planner. A certified financial planner can advise you on how to save and grow your money. Make an appointment with a financial planner to discuss your current status and future plans. If you already are retired, continually review your financial status and make sure any investments are meeting your needs and expectations. Promise #3: Speak with your family – It’s important to share your plans with your family especially in case of an emergency and they need to step in on your behalf. Understanding your wishes and plans will help them make the best decisions for you if needed. They also can let you know who will step in to help, if needed, and even help you make your plans. Planning together lets everyone know they are important and leaves fewer surprises later on. If you already are retired and have done this, make a promise to review your plans with your family again so everyone gets a refresher. Promise #4: Call an attorney – An attorney can help you with anything from wills to care arrangements to powers of attorneys. It’s important to speak with an attorney about these matters early so you can build a plan that you want. Even if you feel you are years away from retiring, it’s important to get many of these things in order now if you haven’t already. Emergencies can happen anytime and having such things as power of attorney (both health and...

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First Aid for Winter Injuries

Posted by on Feb 9, 2015 in Safety Tips | Comments Off on First Aid for Winter Injuries

First Aid for Winter Injuries

Most people who work in cold conditions are aware of their risk of frostbite and hypothermia, but they may be less aware of their risk of dehydration, overexertion, and trench foot caused by cold exposure. Here’s how workers can identify these conditions and treat them appropriately. Here are signs, symptoms, and first-aid recommendations for these cold-induced illnesses and injuries. Trench Foot Trench foot, or immersion foot, is caused when the feet are immersed in cold water at temperatures above freezing for long periods of time. It is similar to frostbite, but considered less severe. Symptoms include tingling, itching, or a burning sensation. OSHA recommends treating trench foot by: • Calling 911 immediately, if the situation appear to be an emergency; otherwise, seek medical assistance as soon as possible. • Removing the shoes, or boots, and wet socks. • Drying the feet without rubbing. Dehydration Workers may think of dehydration as a warm-weather problem, but it is also easy to become dehydrated in cold weather. Those clouds workers breathe out are moisture escaping the body through the lungs. Dehydration can make workers more susceptible to other cold injuries, especially hypothermia. Some symptoms of dehydration may be more difficult to distinguish during cold weather, including dry skin and dry mouth. Workers may be thirsty, but thirst is not a reliable indicator of hydration. The best indicator to use is urine output and color: Dark yellow or amber urine, and infrequent urination, are sure signs that a worker is dehydrated. Treat dehydration by providing fluids that do not contain caffeine or alcohol. In severe cases of dehydration—if the person has not urinated for more than 12 hours, and is suffering extreme fatigue, lethargy, and confusion—get emergency medical assistance. Overexertion Workers can suffer overexertion injuries in cold weather. Cold weather places additional strain on the heart and lungs, making exertion more difficult; it also stiffens tissues, making pulls, strains, and sprains more likely. Workers who have “overdone it” in the cold can be treated with rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE) of the pulled or strained muscle, and with over-the-counter medications. Source: Today’s Safety Daily Advisor Tip from BLR —Business & Legal...

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