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GBA Announces: Mister Handy!

Posted by on Dec 15, 2014 in GBA News | Comments Off on GBA Announces: Mister Handy!

GBA Announces: Mister Handy!

GBA inc General Contractors is proud to announce the launch of its newest division called Mister Handy Service Specialists! As Mister Handy, we will focus on 3 areas of the construction market: Commercial, Residential, and Aging in Place.  Our commercial division targets our business neighbors who do not have a maintenance person on staff and need an experienced handy man from time to time. Or we can set up a continual maintenance agreement so you can focus on being successful. Our residential division targets our neighbors who have a honey-do list that never stops growing. Let us help you get your chores done so you can go out and play! Our Aging in Place division targets our older neighbors whose heart is in their home and want to live there as long as possible.  Our Certified Aging in Place Specialist can perform a Home Assessment to determine potential modifications needed in order to maintain an independent, safe, comfortable living space. Check out our website at www.misterhandy.net or visit our Facebook page at www.facebook/Mister Handy  for DIY tips and neat ideas to help you improve your home.  If you have a project you need help with, you can submit that on our website as well. Or give us a call at 605-721-0164 and we would be happy to help...

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GBA is on Facebook!

Posted by on Dec 15, 2014 in GBA News | Comments Off on GBA is on Facebook!

GBA is on Facebook!

Visit GBA’s Facebook page for project updates, company information and community events. Make sure you “like” our page to receive our updates in your...

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Frostbite & Hypothermia

Posted by on Nov 15, 2014 in Safety Tips | Comments Off on Frostbite & Hypothermia

Frostbite & Hypothermia

Outdoor activities can be fun, but they can also be risky. The South Dakota Safety Council offers the following tips to prevent and treat a couple of the most common problems: hypothermia and frostbite.   How to dress for winter success: Think function, not fashion. The most important preventive measure when fighting the cold is how you dress. Staying dry is as important as staying warm. Dress in light layers. Long underwear made of polypropylene wicks moisture away from the body. Inner layers of wool or waffle weave synthetics provide insulation. The outer layer should be made of wind- and moisture-resistant fabrics. Wearing a hat cuts body heat loss. Cover as much skin as possible. Take extra care with fingers and toes. Wear an extra pair of socks and wear boots. Wearing mittens will keep your fingers warmer than wearing gloves.   Other preventive measures include: Eat well, at least one hot meal a day. Drink hot liquids such as broth, cider or soup. Avoid drinks containing caffeine, such as coffee or tea, and alcoholic beverages, as these can make you more susceptible to the cold. Find out if any medications you are taking will make you more vulnerable to cold. Take extra precautions if they do. Use a “buddy system” to monitor physical reaction to cold when engaging in outdoor activities. Keep your home adequately heated or wear layers indoors. The elderly are more susceptible to cold-related stress. Check on those living alone.   Hypothermia   Hypothermia conjures up pictures of extreme cold. Actually, hypothermia can occur in all types of weather and can result from inadequate heating indoors. Hypothermia is a condition that occurs when the body’s core temperature drops below the norm of 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit. Hypothermia can range from mild to severe, and infants and the elderly are more vulnerable. Watch for these stages. Hypothermia is considered mild when the body temperature is between 98 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Symptoms include a chilly feeling with shivering ranging from slight to violent. The skin begins to numb and the victim loses coordination. As the core temperature decreases, mental sluggishness and slowed speech occur along with some amnesia. Between 90 and 86 degrees Fahrenheit, moderate hypothermia symptoms include severe lack of coordination along with stiffness and immobility. The victim has stopped shivering and is often incoherent, confused and irrational. When the victim’s temperature drops between 86 and 78 degrees Fahrenheit, his/her condition is considered severe. Symptoms include severe rigidity, extreme lethargy with the need for sleep, slowed respiration and slowed heartbeat. The skin feels ice cold. At the lower temperatures the victim lapses into unconsciousness that is followed by death due to heart and respiratory failure. Recognition is the key in treating a victim of hypothermia. The victim should be treated gently because rough treatment may cause cardiac arrest. For mild cases, the victim should be encouraged to stay active to increase body heat. If the victim’s clothes are wet, they should be removed immediately and replaced with dry layers. The victim’s head should be covered and they should be given warm (not hot) sweet fluids. For moderate cases the treatment is much the same as for mild cases, although the extremities should be thoroughly covered. If possible, place warm objects such as hot water bottles next...

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Snow shoveling safety tips

Posted by on Nov 10, 2014 in Safety Tips | Comments Off on Snow shoveling safety tips

Snow shoveling safety tips

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and Blue Care Network recommend that people keep heart health in mind and “take it easy” when clearing driveways and sidewalks. Here are some facts about shoveling: Snow shoveling is hard work. The good news is that shoveling snow for 15 minutes qualifies as a moderate physical daily activity recommended by the U.S. Surgeon General. The bad news is that for many sedentary, out-of-shape Americans, shoveling heavy, wet snow for 10 minutes is equivalent to running on a treadmill to exhaustion. The cold temperatures don’t help, raising blood pressure in people who don’t normally have a blood pressure problem and posing an even greater risk to people with high blood pressure, according to University of Florida researchers. Several easy steps can prevent illness and injuries while shoveling snow in winter. First, anyone who has one of the following conditions should probably not shovel snow without his or her physician’s permission. The list of conditions includes: A personal or family history of heart disease or asthma Already sustained a heart attack A history of back problems High blood pressure High cholesterol level A history of smoking A history of inactivity For healthy, active individuals, the Michigan Blues suggest the following guidelines: Use the right shovel. Shovels with S-shaped handles and non-stick blade surfaces will usually require less effort and minimal bending to move snow. Or, consider pulling the snow out of the way, which requires less exertion. Avoid stimulants (for example, caffeine and nicotine) that can raise your heart rate and restrict blood vessels. Avoid shoveling immediately after having eaten a large meal. Warm up and stretch muscles before shoveling, especially in the morning. Muscles are less susceptible to injury during physical activity after a warm-up. Drink plenty of fluids before and during shoveling to avoid dehydration, but not coffee (see above). Breathing cold air dehydrates the body. Dress in layers. Wear a scarf or mask and/or goggles. Inhaling cold air may constrict arteries, decreasing your heart’s oxygen supply. Start slowly to avoid a sudden load on the heart. An average snow shovelful of heavy, wet snow weighs up to 16 pounds. That means for every 10 minutes of typical shoveling, you’ll be clearing up to 2,000 pounds of white stuff. To lift snow, bend from the knees. Remove heavy snow in two stages. First, skim off the top layer, and then remove the bottom. If snow is too heavy to lift, push it out of the way. Take frequent breaks as needed. Immediately stop if you feel pain or discomfort. No one knows your body as well as you do. If you have a lot to shovel, consider hiring a removal service. If using a snow blower, follow safety precautions completely. Never attempt to clear a clogged or stuck blade or auger before shutting off the power, and avoid wearing objects that can easily get caught in the blade, such as a long scarf. Before starting, be sure children and others stand clear to avoid being injured by hidden objects thrown into the air. Even using a snow blower will elevate heart rates, so consult your doctor if you have a history of heart...

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GBA inc. is celebrating 25 years!

Posted by on Jan 15, 2014 in GBA News | Comments Off on GBA inc. is celebrating 25 years!

GBA inc. is celebrating 25 years!

  Thank you to past and current employees, clients, subcontractors and vendors. Without your support and commitment to the industry, we would not be able to provide superior buildings, built and managed by a team of professionals. We are proud of the work we have done and look forward to another 25...

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